2nd choice = Every Small Grain for social media image 7

The past few weeks it’s become harder and harder to miss that winter is coming – shorter, darker, days, sudden switches from 16 degrees Celsius to 8 degrees Celsius, and, yes, my first cycle ride of the year in full waterproofs!

But although the lack of light tends to send my body and mind towards hibernation mode, it also makes for more time at home, reading and writing, as well as making me appreciate the small burst of sunshine even more!

This at a metaphorical level as well as literal – my publication, events, reviews and reading highlights from the past month or so below.

NEW REVIEWS OF HOW TO GROW MATCHES

P1080021“…each piece finds her opening the floodgates at a precise moment, her delicately controlled releases of anger bringing about effects many miles downstream.

“…Anger often implies and involves the loss of control, but S.A. Leavesley shows that its impact is actually far greater when used with a deft touch. How to Grow Matches is an excellent pamphlet…”

Matthew Stewart, Rogue Strands, full review here

“Vivid and jarring, the 24 poems in this collection delve into the cultural constraints attached to “your office / as a woman.” While many of the pieces focus on a speaker’s growing dissatisfaction with a romantic partnership, other factors—such as family ties and consumer culture—are also probed for the way they influence contemporary women’s self-awareness…

“…although the amusing piece “All the women left” imagines the sudden absence of women at a concert as an emblem for unappreciated female power, these poems in general depict women’s unfinished struggles against unhealthy expectations.”

Jayne Marek, The Lake, the full review, including detailed analysis of some of the poems and themes can be found here

I’m chuffed too to have a new 5-star review of How to Grow Matches (Against The Grain Press) on Amazon from Sue Johnson, where she says:

“Intriguing and compelling – don’t miss this unusual collection!

“I found the poems captivating and intriguing. I read the collection and then went back to the beginning and read it through again. Several of the poems still resonate – particularly ‘Family Trees’, ‘Her cumuli collector’ and ‘Bowl of oranges: a still life.'”

How to Grow Matches is also now on the Poetry Book Society website/available from the PBS shop here.

PUBLICATIONS

I’m absolutely delighted to have a short feature about ‘photo-poems’ including four of my photo-poems showcased in a The High Window Supplementary Feature here.

(A more in-depth 1900-word article on this theme has also been accepted for publication in The Blue Nib in December).

This week has also seen one of my pieces of photographic art, ‘Night Mare Visions’ published by Nitrogen House in their Halloween issue. The full issue can be found here, and Night Mare Visions here.

My article ‘Pairing Poems’ on a Worcestershire UK and Worcester, Massachusetts, transatlantic call-and-response that produced new inspiration and poems was published in Poetry News, autumn issue.

I have a new essay up on Riggwelter, ‘Wardrobes, Fairy Tale Family Trees and the Power of Re-imagining‘, that looks at my writing inspiration in terms of characters. It particularly focuses on the way female characters have featured in literature in the past and how I feel as a woman writer now tackling female character portrayal, settings and relationships. There are also a few links to some character-writing resources.

I’m also delighted to have two poems ‘But’ and ‘The Tything’ accepted for Atrium in December and January – a New Year’s Day publication for my first published piece of 2019!

INTERVIEWS/WRITING LIFE

I’m delighted to have a short blogpost, ‘Elbow Room – contributors speak part two’ up at Elbow Room, celebrating all 20 issues of the journal, its live events and other projects across the past six years.

Recently, I was also interviewed for The Wombwell Rainbow. This can be viewed here and a longer adaptation of this with more links to others’ work to enjoy can also be read here.)

POETRY CAFE REFRESHED, CHELTENHAM

It was wonderful to be guest poet at Poetry Cafe Refreshed, Cheltenham earlier this month – great venue, cracking atmosphere, and lovely poems from everyone – including Sharon Larkin, who runs the event and whose review can be found below.

“A fantastic Poetry Café Refreshed at Smokey Joe’s in Cheltenham last night with guest poet Sarah Leavesley/Sarah James, whose superbly read poems were a masterclass in making every word count and earn its place. We were treated to a rich variety of multilayered poems which spoke (in my interpretation) of disarming dress, listening to the landscape, remaining relevant across generations, net etiquette, art, love, myth, lessons from home and heritage … and, our Brit obsession, the weather. So much depth and so much to enjoy in terms of imagery and wordplay.

“The open mic was of a high standard with super contributions from David Clarke, Jennie Farley, Cliff Yates, Chris Hemingway, Belinda Rimmer, Ross Turner, Gill Wyatt, Michael Newman, Annie Ellis, David Gale, Refreshed’s host Roger Turner (and I read too :-;)”

More about Poetry Café Refreshed, including pictures from the night, can be found on the event blog here, and Sharon’s blog here.

Next month’s Poetry Café Refreshed is with guest poet Pat Edwards on Wednesday, November 21, 2018, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm at Smokey Joe’s Cafe, Bennington Street, Cheltenham.

MY REVIEWS OF OTHERS’ WORK

My fairly detailed review of Tim Miller’s Bone Antler Stone (The High Window Press) is now live at Riggwelter.

MICRO-REVIEW ROUND-UP

The following don’t come close to doing full justice to the pamphlets and collections mentioned, and not just because any summing up can’t replicate actually buying, reading and experiencing the poems directly. However, hopefully these short micro-reviews will give an essence of what’s excited me about these titles.

Suzannah Evans’s Near Future and Roy McFarlane’s The Healing Next Time are very different Nine Arches Press collections yet both full of very striking, powerful and thought-provoking poems about the society we live in and might want or not want to live in looking ahead.

The Healing Next Time‘s poems of witness with a political edge are forcefully moving, making me gasp with emotion but also as a writer in admiration at what Mc Farlane gets the lines to do, their sounds, their details and their shapes on the page.

Meanwhile, Near Future is full of the fizz of humour, language and lively linguistics, including ‘ghuzzles’, ‘applecharge’, ‘writersblox’, the ‘fatberg’, roboblackbird and robobees. As these examples hopefully suggest, the collection is brimming with a wonderful blend of imaginative near-reality and the beauty of what may soon be lost, with the playful edge deepening the darker side of what such a ‘near future’ might actually mean.

Raine Geoghegan’s very atmospheric Hedgehog Poetry Press pamphlet Apple Water: Povel Panni has brought a sense of summer back to the currently mostly grey near-winter days and reminds me of so many things I personally would hate the world to ever lose. The poems are lush and warm with sounds, language and the sense of important family, nature and Romany tradition. There are moving moments and memories presented so vividly that it’s almost as if I’m there in the making of them – tasting the plum pudden, smelling the apples and earth, and discovering the feel of the Romani ‘jib’ words.

The poems in Carrie Etter’s The Weather in Normal (Seren) are powerful compressions, beautifully whittled onto the page, where the white space allows each line to unfold to way more than its literal size and force. Family, place and climate change are all set in even sharper focus by the crafted space between the lines – for thought, emotion, linking – that gives each image, each word choice, each evoked emotion that much greater impact. And that’s without even touching on the narrative arcs across the collection’s three sections giving further depth and meaning!

Sean Magnus Martin’s Flood-Junk (Against The Grain Press) is a mesmerising read, and re-read. Even after several re-readings, it’s hard to put it down and I suspect I’ve still only scratched the surface of the full beauty (and emotional impact) of each poem. This pamphlet is a world of washed-up and damaged things, evoked with vivid and atmospheric imagery. There are striking narratives, dreamlike elements and very human emotions. And for all the sharp edges, the beauty these poems create from damaged nature only cuts deeper as a reminder of what’s being lost, and at risk of even worse loss, in the world around us right now.

Jane Lovell’s Metastatic (Against The Grain Press) is another very different yet absolutely beautiful and moving pamphlet. Wonderful vivid details from nature are set alongside, and give extra edge to, a haunting sense of threat: ghosts, lost paths and landscapes folded away like closed maps. This background narrative of illness, the body’s vulnerability and loss is sharpened both by that contrast and by the way this narrative is implied, rather than directly and explicitly voiced, into and onto everything else. Intensely moving and beautiful poems.

As ever, these micro-reviews are just a sample sample from my recent reads and ‘finds’. Loads of other new titles have joined the bookshelves that I’ve also loved reading but at a time when I’ve not been able to put words together to share that enjoyment.